SHADES OF MILK AND HONEY EPUB

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The fantasy novel you've always wished Jane Austen had written. Shades of Milk and Honey is exactly what we could expect from Jane Austen if she had been. Shades Of Milk and Honey. Home · Shades Of Milk and Honey 7 downloads Views KB Size Report. DOWNLOAD EPUB. This content was uploaded by our users and we assume good faith they have the permission to share this book. If you own the copyright to this book and it is.


Shades Of Milk And Honey Epub

Author:TANISHA KIRSCHNER
Language:English, Indonesian, Dutch
Country:Liechtenstein
Genre:Religion
Pages:667
Published (Last):12.11.2015
ISBN:569-6-18804-640-7
ePub File Size:16.69 MB
PDF File Size:19.42 MB
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Shades of Milk and Honey is an intimate portrait of Jane Ellsworth, a woman ahead of her time in a version of Regency England where the manipulation of. leaves of lockfollolatu.ml MB. lockfollolatu.ml 4 MB. lockfollolatu.ml MB. Poems Emily lockfollolatu.ml SALON by milk + honey Arboretum Market opened its doors in In Kowal's quasi-Regency fantasy debut, plain download Shades of Milk and Honey (Glamourist.

They're red. They're juicy-looking. They're attractive. The difference is that when you bite into said GMO tomato, it tastes like mealy, mushy, tasteless crap. This book is the equivalent of a limp, tasteless slice of tomato on a McDonalds' hamburger. Why bother? You're just going to pick it off and throw it away anywa This book is like Jane Austen's works in the way that a genetically modified out-of-season greenhouse tomato is like a cherry. You're just going to pick it off and throw it away anyway.

Or maybe that's just me. I hate raw tomatoes. This book tries way too hard.

The main character is a doormat. Sorry for all the literary references. Not really. I'm just in a fucking bad mood right now after reading this book and I don't care. Expecting Elizabeth and Jane? Don't hold your breath.

It's literally fucking window decoration! There's no explanation! Magic sparkly dragon fairy dust everywhere and hidden glamour strings being pulled out of thin air like a used fucking tampon string within some invisible female unicorn! What's the fucking point?! Our main character is named Jane! She has a sister, a beautiful beautiful beautiful sister named Melody! Jane has a doting father and a fussy mother who does nothing but whine and gossip and worry about her daughters' marriage prospects.

I'm shocked!!

Their estate is entailed in favor of a male relative. Such wonder! Such surprise! A new neighbor has moved in, a Mr. He is a kind, handsome young gentleman, reserved and polite. I never! He has a young, very shy little sister named Elizabeth 16 years old and not yet debuted! Oh, my! There's a young, charming, handsome military man named Livingston who gambles and flirts, who might or might not have a dark, dastardly, wascally wabbit secret!

There's a dark, brooding man named Mr. Vincent who does nothing but sneerok, he might belong in Jane Eyre instead, if our beloved Rochester has the personality of a moldy potato and none of the good looks, and you might recall Rochester was never much of a looker to begin with!

It depends on which BBC production you watch, of course, but I'd rather not give the dude in this book the benefit of the doubt. So, the love fuckery, I mean, you could call it a love triangle, but again, I'm in a pretty fucking foul mood right now. You would be too if you read pages of nothing! Jane admires Captain Livingston while secretly in love with Mr.

Dunkirk who admires Jane but shows all the attention to Melody, who flirts with Dunkirk and flirts with Mr. Does anyone have Idiot Verse by Keaton Henson pllz!! Mustafa Yaman. Jensa Jensa replied to Pug. Pug , I'm looking for it too! Did you find it? Jamie-Katria Ranile.

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Does anyone have r. Maghfira Aulia. John-Rodney Rodillas replied to Jamie-Katria. Jamie-Katria , search "r. You can find it. Jamie-Katria Ranile replied to John-Rodney. John-Rodney , thank youuuu. Samantha Feriera. Dana Braber. Does anybody have the books of M. Aisha Yinusa. The mistake of the woman and Dilemma of M Sosa please. Naya Lalune. Occasionally, she'll use a word that is archaic and proceeds to misuse it "nuncheon" does not mean "lunch" , repeatedly. When you combine these bizarre word choices with laboured sentences that are borderline-incomprehensible, the experience is more like thumping down a stretch of rapids instead of Austen's effortless babbling brook.

The plot doesn't even get started until halfway through, at which point I already hate Brat and Doormat, which might as well be the names of the central sisters. Most of the characters in this book are so glaringly based on well-known Austen characters that it seems too obvious, and I waited in vain for the twist that would make them new and exciting. No such luck -- if anything, they were stripped of all endearing qualities and hammered flat into one-dimensional puppets.

The magic elements are explained in detail, but are completely incidental to the story. By the end, we've given up all pretense of being in an Austen novel and have stumbled into some sort of quasi-Gothic adventure scene.

I was just so happy to have gotten to the last pages, I didn't even care anymore.

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I bought the book because I love Austen and many Austeny spin-offs , and because I thought the conceit of magic being a womanly art was pretty cool. But now I'm just wondering what the hell reviewers were thinking in recommending this read. I can't help but wonder if the circles she moves in has caused her writing to be overrated, as I have no idea why this particular book merited the sort of publicity push it's currently experiencing. I wish I hadn't read it. View all 4 comments.

So there were many nice things in this book. The Austin-esque plot was interesting, and the main character and her relationship with her sister was layered, I really think the character was well-drawn and the best thing about the book.

Her POV as the "plain" sister was written from a very real place. I guess I just ached for a bit more complexity, with the plot and romance and the world-building. I think the au So there were many nice things in this book.

I think the author could build upon this world for more and more interesting books. This one was a nice basic intro. I think the plot just needed more twists, and there needed to be MORE characters to act as red herrings to make the ending a bit more surprising.

I will read another by her though, def. View all 5 comments. This very talented writer has written a Regency romance that features a few of Jane Austen's spellings, adding in a truly nifty magical system.

Unfortunately, the magic seems little integrated with the world, having almost no impact on the culture.

The comparison with Jane Austen might sell books, but that's also kind of a high bar. This story feels more like a Regency romance, without much of Austenesque irony or complication of character; on the other hand, it is not a retread of Georgette Hey This very talented writer has written a Regency romance that features a few of Jane Austen's spellings, adding in a truly nifty magical system.

This story feels more like a Regency romance, without much of Austenesque irony or complication of character; on the other hand, it is not a retread of Georgette Heyer, which gains major points for me as a reader.

Not that I dislike Heyer or the re-invention of the silver fork sub-genre, I just would like to see authors venture out from under Heyerian influence a tad. The story takes time to warm up, and there are many period glitches but I don't think those will be noticed by readers who aren't conversant with period literature , but when it finally gets going, there is a lot of comedy-of-manners identity mixed with magic thrown in to make it roll along.

I thought the climactic scene humorously cinematic, though the ending rushes upon the readers a bit, especially considering the sedate start. View 1 comment. Aug 28, Bradley rated it really liked it Shelves: Romance and Regency go hand in hand, but then, so does Art.

All the most talented ladies are skilled in the art of subterfuge and seeming, are they not? Well, not Jane. She's conflicted about using Glamour and refuses to make herself seem more pretty than she is, while also being rather more talented than the rest of her family.

Sure, its a common thing to know and use Glamour in the Regency era. Didn't you know? Magic is real, and no only can you create wonderful murals and play wonderful music w Romance and Regency go hand in hand, but then, so does Art.

Magic is real, and no only can you create wonderful murals and play wonderful music without the gross aids of base paints or the piano forte, but it also gives us a tapestry to work out our own personal dramas. How delightful! I've always liked stories that bring up the conflict between lies and bringing forth truth from them. Passion and the heart were always best served through fiction and not stark reality. As an opener into the series, it serves delightfully as a simple romance with silly girls getting into trouble and eligible men causing so much pain and ruckus.

Still, don't trust the blurb that this is much like the books listed there. Think Urban Fantasy meets Regency Romance and you'll be fine. The characters fill the typical Austen tropes, with their own spin.

A lovely story for any fan of the Regency period. Mar 31, Celeste rated it it was amazing Shelves: Full review now posted! This was absolutely delightful. Because they are. This was my first experience with an adult fantasy of manners, and I loved it.

Fantasy of manners is basically if Jane Austen had included magic in her writi Full review now posted! Fantasy of manners is basically if Jane Austen had included magic in her writing. And that is exactly what this book was. So much so, in fact, that some people found the novel too derivative of Austen to merit enjoyment. I beg to differ. I picked this up because I wanted to see what an Austen novel would feel like with magic involved, and that is exactly what I got.

While there were a few variations, that plot line and characters were remarkably similar to the famous cast of Pride and Prejudice, but it was so well written and the characters so well developed that it felt more like an ode to Austen than a plagiarism. The prose never felt too heavy or like the author was trying too hard to mimic her inspiration.

It was convincingly Regency, yet felt fresh at the same time. One of the loveliest aspects of this novel was the magic system. In this alternate Regency era, glamour is another of the womanly arts that eligible bachelorettes in search of a husband are expected to deftly produce. This glamour is a weaving of the magical energy alive in the air.

Glamour can be applied to music, allowing it to loop after being played or producing colors and shapes that complement the tune. It can also be applied to paintings and rooms, brightening them and adding life. But the most impressive use of glamour is found in the production of glamurals, living artwork that engages all five senses.

These glamurals are usually attached to rooms, and can remain as long as the room survives. Working a convincing glamural is the epitome of success for an artist, be they male or female. This makes glamour the most dangerous of the womanly arts, but the respected, as well.

While this is the first book of a series, Shades of Milk and Honey is a perfectly self-contained story, giving readers a full story with a satisfying conclusion. It makes a wonderful standalone novel, if you happen to be looking for something to provide a break from the trilogies and series that fantasy novels always seem to come in.

And if you need a book that is hopeful and has a happily ever after ending, this novel is a breath of fresh air. Original review can be found at Booknest. Good God, I resent this book so much for not being awesome. Georgette Heyer put me in the mood for another regency, and combine that with fantasy?

I want a refund. The Heyer danced along, sparkly with charm; this book plodded, leaving me with an overwhelming sense of claustrophobia and boredom at the shallowness and banality and insipidity of well-to-do country life. And the heroine was frankly too stupid to keep breathing. Mostly though, Good God, I resent this book so much for not being awesome. Mostly though, I resent the muddle.

Shades of Milk and Honey

The magic here is glamour, a womanly art of illusion, used largely for entertainment. It is both dismissed and underestimated, largely by men. Hello metaphor for the entire practice of upper-class female husband-snaring existence. But Kowal seems to have no real control over that, and the overlapping stories of lies and truths are a mess.

With a vapid little lesson about how real art requires passion plunked on top. View all 6 comments. Austen fans, fantasy fans looking for a more intimate scale of tale.

Jane Austen with Magic: Not, interestingly, Heyer-esque; Kowal goes for the older and less comic model. I found it a very pleasant way to spend an evening, to be sure.

Interesting magic system. I much enjoyed the final choice of hero, and the process of that choosing. There were several possibilities in play at first, and the methods of winnowing down the pack by both protagonist and author were instructive. I suspect this crosses over fro Jane Austen with Magic: The Goodreads reviews would likely demonstrate same, but I'm out of time to read them this morning.

Ta, L. Apr 12, Frankie Lovely rated it liked it Shelves: With no smut. A few things I think could be improved upon. But overall a solid read. I would really like to see the magic elements of this become a lot more prominent later in the series though as the magic was very much low key here.

View all 3 comments. I had the oddest reaction to this book - I enjoyed it while reading it, but the moment I'd finished it I couldn't stem a growing swell discontent. Certainly, Ms.

Kowal's command of Regency-era literary styling was excellent - it felt of the time, without being unreadable to a modern reader. And her conceit of "glamour" started out as interesting, but unfortunately, like the rest of the book, really came to naught. What kept me reading at first was the surety that something had to happen eventuall I had the oddest reaction to this book - I enjoyed it while reading it, but the moment I'd finished it I couldn't stem a growing swell discontent.

What kept me reading at first was the surety that something had to happen eventually. And I suppose at the very end it did, but when every other plot point had been dragged out past all reason, it seemed odd that the excitement would be over in a matter of two or three pages.

I think what Ms.

Kowal was attempting was a gentle Regency romance, with magic thrown in. The trouble is, to a committed lover of the Romance genre such as myself, the romance in this book was an utter failure.

She sets up two potential suitors for Jane, and we spend the majority of the book with the one she doesn't pick. The one she does is a cipher - why he falls in love with her is befuddling, especially when they've barely spent any time together. Why, in fact, does she love him? We know she admires his art, but surely admiration of a single skill isn't enough to build an entire romance upon! Further, the magic in this book seems to only serve as a plot contrivance. There's nothing about where it came from, how it was discovered, why it is that glamourists should be itinerant it's clearly more of a skill than just painting.

She's Jane's younger, prettier, bitchier, sister - and she gets away with every bit of bad behavior. There are literally no real consequences for this girl, and meanwhile Jane is constantly trying to get back in her good graces.

By the end of the book, I would have cheered if a tree had fallen on her. All in all, not an unpleasant read while in progress, but very unsatisfying once one sits down to think about it at all.

Jan 20, Jacob Proffitt rated it really liked it Shelves: I suppose that it is natural to compare any competently written book featuring Regency-era gentry and romance to Jane Austen. Inevitable as it is, I kind of wish it weren't so common. This book isn't anything like Jane Austen except in the above surface aspects. The thing is, the book has a charm and grace of its own that I deeply enjoyed and appreciated and the fact it does so without cribbing noticeably from any of the Regency greats most notably Austen and Heyer is a really remarkable achie I suppose that it is natural to compare any competently written book featuring Regency-era gentry and romance to Jane Austen.

The thing is, the book has a charm and grace of its own that I deeply enjoyed and appreciated and the fact it does so without cribbing noticeably from any of the Regency greats most notably Austen and Heyer is a really remarkable achievement. Jane Ellsworth is a wonderful character.

She's extremely kind, even in the face of great provocation, but without being a complete doormat. She's remarkable for her lack of beauty and that has bothered her throughout her life—and this isn't one of those "doesn't see her own inner beauty" deals, either, and is confirmed intertextually and without compromise.

This is particularly painful for Jane when her sister, Melody, is an acknowledged beauty. Kowal pulls us gracefully into Jane's life as she suffers the petty jealousies of her sister I know, right? With all the excuse to despair, I was glad to join Jane as she channels her energies into the magic of glamor and into the people around her.

I'm still not sure what to think of the magic in the book. It was an interesting setup with a good mix of constraint and freedom but it also felt a little unexplored as well. Glamor seemed to be solely artistic and glamorists much like any other artist at the time—dependant on generous patrons and employed as much as status symbol as for any intrinsic value in and of themselves.

Personally, I don't download that. Even if glamor is all illusion and no substance there's a lot that can be done with even just that much. And a society with that ease of access to illusion would be more fundamentally different from our own, I think, than this story admitted to. Still, since the magic was only an ancillary part of the story, the fact it didn't penetrate as well as I'd have liked didn't detract from my enjoyment of reading it.

Kowal is good enough that the wit, dialogue, and manners of that era flowed seamlessly and realistically and the period feels right, otherwise with only really minor details out of step with historical accuracy. It could be that broader changes from the magic weren't pursued in order to maintain that more accurate Regency feel.

So I enjoyed the novel quite a bit—mainly for the characters and relationships. The plot was fun and well-paced, and even if I yearned for more in some aspects, it wasn't enough to detract from a really fun read. Jun 20, Lisa rated it really liked it Shelves: Review from Tenacious Reader: Shades of Milk and Honey is a wonderful regency romance with just enough magic or glamour to add an extra layer of enchantment for the reader.

For anyone who enjoys Jane Austen, I highly recommend this one. While the story is enjoyable, I also feel like this is a style of book where you just enjoy how it is told, and immersing yourself in the world and time period.

The main protagonist, Jane, is not a stunning beauty, but she Review from Tenacious Reader: The main protagonist, Jane, is not a stunning beauty, but she does have an extraordinary ability to weave glamours illusions. While she is past the normal marrying age and resigned to be spinster her word, not mine , you also know that she will not lead a boring life. She has a passion for what she does, and a personality that can thrive with independence.

The book is full of potential romances. Melody may be beautiful, but her ability with glamour is not very strong. Being able to work glamours is a skill that is well regarded, and some may even consider essential, for ladies of the time.

They use it to adorn their home, create flowers or patterns where there are none, create colors to go with music, illusions to make the home more beautiful. Trying to determine the true motivations of all the characters and what their end goals might be is part of the fun.

Overall, I just really enjoyed this one. It was a wonderful change of pace for me, and hit the spot perfectly.

I wanted something lovely and fun, and was avoiding the darkness that I so typically seek out in books. It delivered everything I was looking for and to be honest, as soon as I finished it, I went straight into the next in series. Always a good sign. A very enjoyable Regency drama where one of the fine aristocratic arts practiced by young ladies is that of magical glamour. Magic is simply part of society, woven quietly and subtly into an otherwise perfectly recognisable nineteenth century romance or comedy of manners.

Fans of Austen who want a a little sprinkle of stardust mixed into their Sense and Sensibility couldn't do better than this. For my personal tastes this was a little to quiet and subdued but it was thoroughly lovely and I would A very enjoyable Regency drama where one of the fine aristocratic arts practiced by young ladies is that of magical glamour.

For my personal tastes this was a little to quiet and subdued but it was thoroughly lovely and I wouldn't hesitate to recommend it to others. Aug 12, Allison rated it really liked it Shelves: More for the historical romance fan than the fantasy lover, the magic here largely took the place of art. The main focus is country neighborhood drama with a definite Austen feel to it.

If you enjoy fantasy of manners, you should enjoy this. I thought the magic added a nice touch to the romance. If you go into the book expecting Jane Austen levels of wit and social satire, you are going to be disappointed. But I didn't. I went in expecting a fantasy novel set in an Austen-like world with an Austen-like romance plot, and so I was fine.

And the magic system was really interesting to me. So basically, this is Regency England if magic were real, and largely considered another art, just like music and painting and dancing, and one that is a concern for the ladies, rather than menfolk.

This intersection of domesticity and femininity and art was something I found really interesting! And the magic itself was really cool in execution. Our main character, Jane, is talented at the art of glamour, as it's called, which is mostly used to create three dimensional, moving art for the senses including movement, smell, and sound. One of the main reasons I will be continuing the series, despite some pretty significant flaws in this book, is because of the magic system.

On the other hand, Jane is insufferable for large portions of the novel , when clearly she isn't meant to be. Jane being insufferable is entirely a writing issue. And I did, for about the first third of the novel. See, Jane is twenty-eight, which is basically fifty in Regency years. She is plain, with a long nose, but very talented at music and art and glamour.

She also has an unrequited thing for her neighbor, Mr. Dunkirk, who seems to have a thing for her beautiful sister, and whom her sister likes in return. Her father will settle a nice sum of money upon her if she were to marry. Anyway, my point is, Jane is inherently likable! It really should have been super easy to keep us on her side.

Unfortunately, she spends so much time being flat-out stupid it becomes very difficult. Only the most oblivious of readers and characters could fail to miss that Dunkirk doesn't give two shits about Melody, instead having a thing for Jane. He's always talking to her and ignoring Melody, he makes excuses to see her, invites her on walks and horseback rides with his sister, encourages her friendship with his sister, tells her explicitly that what he desires is a woman who can make his house seem like a home with her glamour, etc.

Melody even leaves the room and pouts for extended periods of time and Dunkirk doesn't notice. He shows almost no interest in her, save when she's injured.

But it never once crosses poor Jane's mind, not even for an instant, that she could be the one he likes. Instead, she spends inordinate amounts of time being viciously jealous of her sister for having Mr. Her sister is also viciously jealous of Jane's talent, and resents only being a pretty face, and when she expresses this sentiment to Jane, Jane dismisses it as false because she can't comprehend why her sister would ever feel like that.

It was a huge waste of story and character in almost every respect. The rest of the novel is just as uneven, with fun things balanced out by problems. For example, Jane's relationship with the passionate glamourist Mr.

Vincent is pleasing, but there isn't nearly enough of it. At the end when view spoiler [he proposes and she accepts with such joy, a lot of my being happy was there only because I wanted it to be, and not because the book had earned it.

Kowal put more effort into developing Jane's relationship with Dunkirk's sister, Beth, than she did Jane's love interest.I stammer and blush when he is present. Such a small thing, those words, but it was the first time she could recall coming to his special notice. He is a kind, handsome young gentleman, reserved and polite. For example, if the working of glamour is so essential to a lady, but so few men do it, why is there no sign of any assumptions of effeminacy that would likely go with that?

Magic is simply part of society, woven quietly and subtly into an otherwise perfectly recognisable nineteenth century romance or comedy of manners.